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Sunday 18 February 2024

When did we begin to say that?

William Strutt's depiction of
an Australian giving a cooee.
This is a prologue to my pitching a very different sort of book to publishers: it is about the words and phrases that we Australians use among ourselves, to the utter confusion of outsiders.

Here you see a refined selection from a far larger number of entries in my ms, and these all start with A. Right now, there are 1160 distinct expressions (you can find them all listed at the end of this page) and some 2450 quotations from carefully recorded original sources. In most cases, I have been able to push the first use date from what you will find in other similar works: each entry has been meticulously checked: I am right, and they are wrong.

The print sources are all sorts of books, the the Trove newspaper archive, on which I am an active voluntrove. The collection presents Australian English at its most inventive.

The main surprises in this sample:

* how early some Australians realised that our indigenous people were being ripped off;
* how early some expressions crept into the language;
* that alligator in The Rocks  (it had to be a goanna;
* how we learned to make floors out of ant bed;
* how soon we started marking Anzac Day;
* when we started saying 'Australia'.

I could go on about the rest, but just scroll down to the list below. Here is a collection of sample entries:

Aboriginal blood: 1837

John Dunmore Lang, An Historical and Statistical Account of New South Wales, 2nd edition, 1837, volume 1, 37.

There is black blood, at this moment, on the hands of individuals of good repute in the colony of New South Wales, of which all the waters of New Holland would be insufficient to wash out the deep and indelible stains!

Aboriginal land: c. 1852

Rudston Read, What I Heard, Saw and Did at the Australian Gold Fields, 252.

I heard a native in the town of Sofala … amusing a lot of diggers by chaffing a sergeant of mounted police … asking him what business had he or any other white fellow to come and take his land, and rob him of his gold? What would he … say, if black fellow went to England and “turn em Queen out”?

aborigines: 1798

David Collins, An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, vol. 1, 1798, 454.

Conversing with Bennillong after his return from England, where he had obtained much knowledge of our customs and manners … I then asked him where the black men (or Eora) came from? He hesitated; did they come from any island? His answer was, that he knew of none: they came from the clouds (alluding perhaps to the aborigines of the country); and when they died, they returned to the clouds (Boo-row-e). He wished to make me understand that they ascended in the shape of little children, first hovering in the tops and in the branches of trees; and mentioned something about their eating, in that state, their favourite food, little fishes.

absentee: 1803

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, 11 September 1803, 4.

JAMES WEST, a Convict-servant, By HIS EXCELLENCY’S Permission taken off the Store.
All Persons are hereby strictly Cautioned against Harbouring and Employing the said Absentee; and whoever will give Information concerning him to Henry Kable, at Sydney, shall be handsomely Rewarded.

absquatulate: 1846

South Australian Gazette and Colonial Register, 8 August 1846, 2.

When Governor Grey “absquatulated” to New Zealand, he carried off with him, by no, other authority than his own that we ever heard of, about £6000 of money belonging to the colonists of South Australia …but [as] a second supply of money of nearly the same amount is on its way to New Zealand, it is time to inquire by what authority is the money of the colonists misappropriated?

according to Cocker: 1826

The Australian (Sydney), 27 September 1826, 2. This phrase means reliably or correctly calculated.

Consequently, only one fourth of the whole number of flocks and herds in the Colony graze on the waste lands. That is, according to Cocker, out of profits amounting to one hundred thousand pounds, a Government Regulation in one instant deducts twenty thousand pounds, and abstracts that sum from the pockets of settlers…

act your age, not your shoe size: 1995

The Canberra Times, 18 April 1995. 24.

Peper was also told that the spectator was drunk, and that he had also clashed with Norman last year. “Last year Greg evidently told this guy to, ‘Start acting your age, not your shoe size’. This guy held the grudge for a year.”

aerial ping pong: 1945

The West Australian, 24 November 1945, 5. Article ‘Brave New Words’.

The most popular Army gamble is the “swi game,” from the German for two. Rugby is “organised wrestling”; Australian rules football, “aerial pingpong.” Any type of dessert is “pudding”; rice is “Ah Foo Ballast”; sausages are “snaggers”; tea is “chi” or “brew.”

Aeroplane jelly: 1928

Daily Advertiser (Wagga Wagga), 12 July 1928, 5.

AEROPLANE JELLIES AND CUSTARDS: 5½d Packet...

aggro: 1970

Tribune (Sydney), 5 August 1970, 2.

The present society gives them their values, turning their aggressive revolt against their boring school or factory existence into physical aggression (“aggro” in skinhead language) and a philistine hatred for culture.

all froth and no beer: 1889

Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate, 14 December 1889, 9.

Sympathy without something substantial is all froth and no beer.

alligator: 1788

Arthur Bowes Smyth, Journal, HRNSW (2), 394. It was actually a lace monitor, or goanna.

16 February 1788 An alligator, ab’t 8 feet long, was seen close by where I go to birdlime just behind the camp, and has been seen among the tents at night more than once.

all over, red rover: 1984

Port Lincoln Times (SA), 24 August 1984, 32.

Coffey tried hard all day and took some good marks, but mistakes further down the line wasted these precious opportunities. At the last change it was all over red rover unless someone was. able to perform a miracle.

ambo: 1928

Western Mail (Perth), 27 December 1928, 2. Very early, but is it related?

Ambo” (Perth) writes: “From what is the word ambulance derived?” The word ambulance is derived from the Latin “Ambulare,” to move about, and has come into English through the French, the substantive “ambulance” being formed from the objectival participle “ambulant,” as in “hopital ambulant” (moving hospital.)

ankle-biter: 1900

Referee (Sydney), 12 September 1900, 5. (A different meaning?)

But the optics of the young millionaire fairly, glistened as they lit upon a speaking likeness of Mr. E. H. Fry, side by side with an ‘ankle-biter’ of Mr. ‘Joe’ Thompson.

another pair of sleeves: 1850

The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, 2 February 1850, 3. Filler from the US: indicates origin.

Hurrying back to the bank, he informed the paying teller that he had made a mistake. “We rectify no mistakes after the parties have left the bank,” was the reply. “Yes, but you’ve paid me too much money.” This was quite “another pair of sleeves.” The officers of the bank were instantly on the qui vive. Mr. Jesserun handed in the 1000 and received a 100 in return, without even a “thank you!” by way of difference. [New York Globe.]

ant bed floor: 1890

The Australasian (Melbourne), 12 July 1890, 43.

Consequently he stopped, and going down upon his knees on the ant-bed floor, opened his box, took out a bundle of papers and a small packet.

ant bed floor: 1893

Mrs A. (Julia) Blitz, ‘An Australian Millionaire’, serialised in Evening News, (Sydney), 18 September 1893, 7. At the close of the 19th century, Julia Blitz felt she needed to explain ant bed to the readers of her novel. The drawing room she describes was in a house that was once a station manager’s quarters.

The “drawing-room” floor was of ant-bed, which, when crushed to powder and mixed with water, hardens like cement; the walls were papered at intervals with woodcuts from illustrated periodicals and some painted almanacs, which served to partly conceal the ungainly fissures of the slabs and curtain their ugliness.

ant bed floor: c. 1896

K. (‘Katie’) Langloh Parker, Australian Legendary Tales, 1896. The dardurr was the Yuwalaraay name for the Eora gunya.

The young men did as they were bade. When they had the bark cut and brought in, Wirreenun said: “Go you now and raise with ant-bed a high place, and put thereon logs and wood for a fire, build the ant-bed about a foot from the ground. Then put you a floor of ant-bed a foot high wherever you are going to build a dardurr.”

ant bed: 1899

The Northern Miner (Charters Towers), 11 November 1899, 5.

…office and store for tools, detonators, &c., combined, 12 by 10 tent, with the added luxury of an ant-bed floor…

ant caps: 1896

Kalgoorlie Miner, 28 October 1896, 2.

In about six or seven weeks hence the members of the local Presbyterian denomination will worship in a new building in Cassidy-street … Bricks have been used for the base work, and these have been covered with ant caps.

ants: 1770

Sir Joseph Banks, The Endeavour Journal of Sir Joseph Banks, vol. 2.

23 May 1770…upon the sides of the lagoon grew many Mangrove trees in the branches of which were many nests of Ants, one sort of which were quite green. These when the branches were disturbd came out in large numbers and revengd themselves very sufficiently upon their disturbers, biting sharper than any I have felt in Europe.

ants: c. 1844

Louisa Ann Meredith, Notes and Sketches of New South Wales, 69. This is a bull ant.

Many various kinds of ants inhabit New South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land: I know about a dozen species myself. One is a very formidable-looking personage, full an inch long, with a shiny coat of mail gleaming purple and blue, and a threatening sting, which I am told inflicts a most painful wound, as severe as that of the hornet.

Anzac: 1915

The Advertiser, 8 June 1915, 12. At this early time, ‘Anzac’ is a place, or HQ.

During the progress of the fight I received information from Anzac that enemy reinforcements had been seen advancing from Maidos towards Krithia.

Anzac biscuits: 1916

Sunday Times (Perth) 4 Jun 1916, 7. A recipe contest: she got an engraved electroplated butter knife. The leading winners were melon and lemon conserve; chilli wine and wheaten meal biscuits.

Fourth prize is awarded to Mrs. M. Sutherland Grosvenor, Mt. Kokeby, for recipe—
Anzac Ginger Biscuits.
Ingredients: One cup treacle, quarter-cup dripping or butter, quarter-cup sugar, quarter-cup milk. Put on stove to make hot. Then put in dessertspoonful of ginger, one teaspoonful of baking soda and enough flour to roll out stiff. Cut round. Bake in moderate oven.

ANZAC Day: 1915

The Advertiser, 28 August 1915, 2. Note that this was to be October 13. The April 25 day was still a long way ahead.

The Executive Committee of the MONSTER PROCESSION, PAGEANT, and CARNIVAL to be held on WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, in aid of THE WOUNDED SOLDIERS’ FUND, has decided that the day shall be known as ANZAC DAY. The Souvenir offered by the Committee to the person whose suggestion for a title was adopted has been awarded to Mr. Robert Wheeler, Prospect.

ANZAC Day: 1915

Barrier Miner, 13 October 1915, 3: this is the 161st instance of “Anzac Day” in Trove, and the first from outside South Australia (but it is from Broken Hill, which always looked to Adelaide).

Mr. James referred to the “Anzac Day” celebration which, was to be held in Adelaide in connection with the Eight Hours’ Day celebrations there the proceeds from which were to be utilised to swell the South Australian Wounded Soldiers’ Fund.

ANZAC Day: 1915

Sydney Morning Herald, 14 October 1915, 10. Before this event, there were almost 220 “hits”. This one was in the interstate press notices—on page 10!

ADELAIDE, Wednesday. This year the Eight-hours Day committee sacrificed the identity of its celebration by conducting a carnival in aid of the wounded Soldiers’ Fund. The committee was enlarged to embrace all sections of the community, and the day was observed as Anzac Day. Many thousands of people witnessed the street procession.

ANZAC Day: 1915

The Advertiser, 20 October 1915, 14: a brawl had broken out between drunken soldiers and police—but this ‘Day’ was on October 13, not April 25.

THE STREET RIOT. Incidents connected with the riot in King William-street on Anzac Day were again related in the Adelaide Police Court on Tuesday, when Allen Dalziell was charged with having hindered Constable Feudeloff in the execution of his duty, namely, while he was arresting John Davoren on a charge of drunkenness.

ANZAC Day: 1915

Gippsland Times, 16 December 1915, 3: yet another date for the day, 17 December. There were more than 400 instances of “Anzac Day” before this.

The … Lord Mayor’s Central “Button” Committee has fixed to-morrow as “Anzac” day, and have issued at special “remembrance” button to be sold throughout the Commonwealth at the usual price of 1/ [one shilling], the proceeds to be divided between all the tents working for the welfare of those under arms either at home or the front, viz., Y.M.C.A., Churches of England, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, Methodist, and Salvation Army.

ANZAC Day: 1916

The Brisbane Courier, 10 January 1916, 8, and now the pattern was set. ANZAC day would be April 25.

Proposed Celebration in Brisbane. A public meeting will be held in the Exhibition Hall this evening to discuss the steps to be taken for the celebration of Anzac Day on April 25.

ANZAC Day: 1916

The Register (Adelaide), 10 January 1916, 4. He was an early adopter!

(‘Well, I was 70 years old last birthday,’ remarked the gentleman from Blackrock, ‘and I am not likely to forget it, because it was April 25, Anzac Day.’

apples (she’s): 1941

Western Mail, 18 December 1941, 35. This and the next entry both come from W.A.

Darkness, was approaching, so the three anti-tank gunners, reconciled to their unhappy position, placed the ammunition in a handy place ready for use … The corporal came along and during a “once over” found that in the hurry of the previous night the ammunition had not been primed! Imagine the feelings of the three anti-tank gunners! After the first dread thoughts had passed away out came the postal orderly’s final remarks: “Wouldn’t it ——. Anyhow, she’s apples.”

apples (she’s): 1945

The West Australian, 24 November 1945, 5, Article ‘Brave New Words’.

Anything satisfactorily arranged or done is sometimes “sewn up” but more frequently: “she’s apples” or “she’s caster.” The roots of both phrases are unknown.

argy-bargy: 1888

Shepparton Advertiser (Vic.), 16 August 1888, 1. Note that this is Scots dialect.

I winna argy-bargy wi’ ye, Tammas; but I dinna see hoo ye cud get at it by presentiment.

artesian water: 1881

Gippsland Mercury (Sale, Vic.), 5 May 1881, 3.

By direction of the mayor, the artesian well water was allowed to stream into the street during the afternoon hours, and considerable interest was manifested by our visitors in the, to them, unusual sight.

artesian water: 1881

The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser, 17 September 1881, 513. It needed explaining.

The great under current is tapped at last. Mr. J. H. Angas has got Artesian water 2.5 miles north of the Blinman, and it runs to the surface. We shall have the real Australian rivers upon the surface yet.

Arthur or Martha: 1943

Daily Mirror (Sydney) 7 September 1943, 6. The fish wrapper newspapers carried syndicated stories like this. There had been an indecipherable instance of A or M, in the Inverell Times 16 May 1941, long before Japan entered the war.

Some of the warships built a smokescreen on either flank and the landing boats surged forward into the valley in between. Others steamed offshore from Lae and pounded the town and the ‘drome. Bombers dropped their loads on Lae until the Japs didn’t know whether they were Arthur or Martha. Then the shelling of the beach suddenly ended and the time for wondering was over and the time for action had come.

Arthur or Martha: 1948

Truth (Sydney), 14 March 1948, 17. See Rafferty’s rules.

THE LATE lamented Mr. Rafferty would have jumped with joy had he been at Erskineville Oval yesterday, when Eastern Suburbs and Newtown staged trials for the coming League season. Players were all over the place like Brown’s cows, and most didn’t know whether they were Arthur or Martha. Still, the season’s only beginning, and Rafferty will be put to shame later.

arvo: 1926

Sydney Mail, 25 August 1926, 16.

‘And the shivoo’s this arvo?’
‘Er — yes.’
She slipped over to the window. Red and Alf were still busy with the car.
‘Slip off yer shoes,’ she said curtly. ‘Now follow me.’

ash tray on a motor bike: 1990

The Canberra Times, 18 February 1990, 9.

Here is one more piece of very important advice. Check the expiry date on your card before your leave home. If it expires while you are overseas, it will be as useful as an ashtray on a motor bike.

Aussie Rules: 1907

Coolamon-Ganmain Farmers’ Review, 19 July 1907, 11.

JUNEE SLOW TO START IN AUSSIE RULES GAME.
On Saturday, Junee Australian Rules team went down to Holbrook after a very slow start. Junee, it will be remembered, were very slow to get going against Yerong Creek after pushing The Rock to 10 points the week before, but on Saturday they slept through the first half until awakened by coach Roy Hart in the dressing room … but they had shut the gate too late.

Aussie salute: 1966

The Australian Women’s Weekly, 1 June 1966, 10. Almost there…

On to Alice Springs, where Pat said she was given the traditional Aussie salute flies! “Not that they bothered me much. Those fly sprays are pretty good.”

Australia: 1813

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, 30 January 1813, 3. A poem called ‘Effusions of Gratitude’, by Michael Massey Robinson. First Australian use in print.

FROM Albion’s blest Isle have we cross’d the wide Main,
And brav’d all the Dangers, of Neptune’s Domain—
The Hurricane’s Whirlwind, the Tempest’s loud Roar,
An Asylum to find on Australia’s rude Shore
For the Genius of Britain sent forth a Decree,
That her Sons should be exil’d—once more to be free!

This is a good place to stop, because this pre-dates Matthew Flinders' often-cited use of Australia in a footnote

Now get your chops around this lot, and ask when you last mullenised something. or wore a donkey-supper hat...


Aboriginal blood: 1837;  Aboriginal land: c. 1852;  aborigines: 1798;  absentee: 1803;  absquatulate: 1841;  according to Cocker: 1826;  act your age, not your shoe size: 1995;  aerial ping pong: 1945;  Aeroplane jelly: 1928;  aggro: 1970;  aggy: 1899;  all froth and no beer: 1889;  alligator: 1788;  all over, red rover: 1984;  ambo: 1928;  ankle-biter: 1900;  another pair of sleeves: 1850;  ant bed: 1890;  ant caps: 1896;  ants: 1770;  Anzac: 1915;  Anzac biscuits: 1916;  ANZAC Day: 1915;  apples (she’s): 1941;  argy-bargy: 1888;  artesian water: 1881;  Arthur or Martha: 1943;  arvo: 1926;  ash tray on a motor bike: 1990;  Aussie: 1915;  Aussie Rules: 1907;  Aussie salute: 1921;  Australasia: 1793;  Australia: 1793;  Australian Rules: 1865;  babbler: 1904;  back-blocks: 1862;  back chat: 1895;  backhander: 1894;  back of beyond: 1830;  back of Bourke: 1871;  bad trot: 1914;  bagman: 1841;  Bagman’s Gazette: 1900;  bail up: 1844.;  balls-up: 1970;  Bananaland: 1881;  bandicoot: 1799;  banker, running a: 1866;  barbie: 1973;  bar, bull: 1979;  bark hut: 1815;  barney: 1855;  barrack: 1883;  barracker: 1881;  barracking: 1878;  bar, roo: 1977;  bash hat: 1950;  basket weavers: 1982;  bastard: 1945;  bastardry: 1945;  bathers: 1911;  bathing: 1810;  bathing dress: 1830;  Bathurst burr: 1850;  battler: 1901;  beak: 1838;  beanie: 1945;  beano: 1908;  bean (without a): 1891;  beauty bottler: 1957;  bee’s knees: 1874;  belly buster: 1933;  belly-flop: 1924;  Belyando spew: c. 1864;  berko: 1988;  berley: 1871;  bicycle: 1851;  big hat no cattle: 1994;  big note: 1938;  big smoke: 1854;  big wigs: 1825;  bike: 1898;  bikkies: 1890;  bikkies (money): 1977;  bilby: 1886;  billabong: 1838;  billy: 1827;  billycart: 1898;  billy lids: 2000;  billy-o: 1887;  bindi-eye: 1907;  bingey: 1882;  bint: 1945;  bite his lug: 1900;  bitser: 1926;  bitumen, leave the: 1926;  blackbirding: c. 1827;  blackfellow: 1831;  blackleg: 1865;  Black Maria: 1868;  black stump: 1865;  black tracker: 1828;  Blind Freddy: 1907;  bloke: 1848;  blokey: 1990;  bloodhouse: 1901;  bloody: 1853;  blow: 1929;  blowfly: 1829;  blowie: 1911;  Blucher boots: 1821;  bludger: 1897;  bluegum: 1803;  blue (in the sense of lose money): 1898;  Blue Mountain parrot: 1823;  Blue Mountains: 1793;  blue, start a: 1938;  bluetongue: 1849;  Bluey: 1845;  bluey: 1880;  blunt: 1826;  bob (shilling): 1838;  bodgie: 1950;  Bogan: 1987;  bogey: 1788;  bog roll: 1988;  boiling down: c. 1843;  bolter: 1827;  bombora: 1901;  Bondi tram, like a: 1943;  bonzer: 1851;  boodle: 1898;  Boofhead: 1924;  boofy: 1993;  boomerang: 1804;  boots and all: 1838;  borak: 1893;  boring as batshit: 1999;  boshter: 1903;  bosker: 1912;  boss cockie: 1875;  Boss-of-the-Board: 1900;  Boss-of-the-Board: 1900;  Botany Bay: 1786;  boundary rider: 1860;  bowerbird: 1894;  bowlo: 2004;  bowyangs: 1889;  box tree: 1834;  brass razoo: 1927;  breakaway: 1893;  brekky: 1900;  brickfielder: 1829;  brickie: 1902;  brick short of a load: 1992;  bright-eyed and bushy-tailed: 1954;  Brown’s cows: 1841;  brown-eye: 1981;  brum (penny): 1861;  brumby: 1871;  brush: 1788;  bubbler: 1912;  Buckley’s chance: 1887;  budgerigar: 1845;  budgie smugglers: 2006;  bugger me dead: 1975;  buggy: 1806;  Bullamakanka: 1948;  Bulletin: c.1880;  bullock driver: 1813;  bull-roarer: 1888;  Bundy clock: 1905;  bunger: 1891;  bunny: 1952;  bunya bunya: 1841;  bunyip: 1845;  bunyip aristocracy: 1853;  burning o: 1805;  burrawang: 1831;  bush: 1801;  bush bashing: 1943;  bush carpenter: 1902;  bushed: 1847;  bushfire: 1831;  bush inn: c. 1850;  bush lawyer: 1835;  bush lemon: 1910;  bushman: 1832;  bushranger: 1805;  bush store: 1847;  bush telegraph: 1863;  bush tucker: 1884;  bushwoman: 1869;  busier than Bourke street: 1877;  busier than Pitt Street: 1869;  B.Y.O.: 1968;  Cabbage Garden: 1842;  cabbage tree hat: 1799;  cabbage tree mob: 1841;  cabs: 1852;  Cab Sav: 1974;  cackleberry: 1918;  call a spade a bloody shovel: 1897;  camp: 1788;  canary: 1853;  cane toad: 1935;  cark: 1983;  cart: c. 1854;  caser: 1892;  cask wine: 1975;  Catherine Hayes: 1859;  cedar: 1795;  celestials: 1856;  chalkie: 1928;  champagne tastes on a beer budget: 1941;  chap: 1898;  chardonnay socialist: 1987;  charged like a wounded bull: 1976;  chateau cardboard: 1987;  chats: 1917;  cheap as chips: 1875;  chewy: 1922;  Chico roll: 1958;  chocolate crackles: 1937;  chockers: 1990;  choof off: 1965;  chook: 1889;  chook raffle: 1956;  chook with its head chopped off: 1982;  Chow: 1855;  chow: 1899;  Christmas beetle: 1893;  chuck: 1838;  chuck a u-ey: 1975;  chuck a wobbly: 1986;  chunder: 1954;  churchyarder: 1900;  chyack: 1873;  cigar: 1859;  Circular Quay: 1836;  civvies: 1946;  Clayton’s: 1983;  clean skins: 1868;  clearing: 1788;  clear out: 1831;  clobber: 1884;  clothes hoist: 1911;  clothes props: 1846;  coach travel: 1821;  coal: 1797;  cobber: 1890;  cobbler: 1827;  cobbler’s pegs: 1864;  cockatoo: c. 1854;  cockatoo fence: 1842;  cockatoo (lookout): 1991;  cock-eye bob: 1884;  cockies: 1878;  cockie’s joy: 1901;  coffee: 1902;  coffee tent: 1852;  coldie: 1985;  Collins street cocky: 1924;  come good: 1948;  come in spinner: 1919;  comic cuts: 1922;  Compo: 1921;  concertina: 1892;  conchy: 1917;  constables: 1826;  cooee: 1826;  coolamon: 1854;  coot: 1915;  corduroy road: 1856;  corn: 1834;  Cornstalk: 1827;  cossies: 1903;  cot case: 1915;  could eat a horse and chase the rider: 1934;  country store: 1834;  Cousin Jack: 1864;  cove: 1817;  cow cocky: 1907;  cracker night: 1890;  crack hardy: 1897;  crack onto: 1974;  crawler: 1864;  creek: 1790;  cricket: 1804;  crimson: 1883;  crinoline: 1839;  cronk: 1900;  crook: 1896;  cropper, come a: 1859;  crow-eaters: 1870;  cry crack: 1871;  cuddy: 1826;  cultural cringe: 1951;  currency: 1822;  cut lunch: 1913;  cut out: 1867;  cycling: c. 1895;  cyclists: 1899;  dacks: 1982;  dag: 1971;  dags (wool): 1928;  Dagwood dog: 1951;  dam: 1869;  damper: 1825;  darg: 1879;  date: 2003;  dead cert: 1877;  dead flat: 1900;  dead marine: 1856;  dead set: 1954;  deaf adder: 1832;  deaner (shilling): 1892;  death adder: 1845;  death warmed up: 1922;  demo: 1952;  derro: 1976;  devon sausage: 1994;  didgeridoo: 1918;  did his block: 1904;  didn’t come down in the last shower: 1893;  digger: 1817;  digging: 1849;  dill: 1946;  dilly bag 1829;  dilly-dallying: 1826;  dingbat: 1887;  dingo: 1788;  dinkum: 1917;  dinky di: 1914;  diphthong ships: 1852;  dipstick: 1982;  disperse: 1805;  divvy: 1885;  Dixie: 1918;  do a Melba: 1950;  dob in: 1953;  dodgy: 1856;  dog’s breakfast: 1903;  do his lolly: 1954;  doing the Block: 1854;  dole: 1915;  dole bludger: 1975;  dollop: 1833;  Dolly’s wax: 1909;  donah: 1889;  done like a dinner: 1838;  done me dash: 1915;  donkey engine: 1852;  donkey-supper hat: c. 1897;  donkey vote: 1894;  don’t bust your foofer valve: 1884;  don’t give a rat’s: 1994;  doover: 1941;  double dink: 1914;  double-headed coins: 1885;  dowak: 1848;  down the gurgler: 1979;  down under: 1907;  drafting: 1836;  drag the chain: 1840;  dray: 1820;  drink with the flies: 1898;  drongo: 1837;  drop bear 1967;  dropsies: 1952;  drought: c. 1842;  drought: 1878;  drover: 1814;  drover’s dog: 1868;  dry-blower: 1869;  duchess (v): 1944;  duck’s disease: 1940;  dud: 1918;  duds: 1900;  duffer: 1853;  duffing: 1856;  dummy: 1896;  dumper: 1912;  dunny: 1942;  earbash 1944;  echidna: 1828;  ecology: 1905;  education: c. 1830;  elastic-side boots: 1896;  elderly: 1900;  emu: 1788;  emu eggs: 1829;  emu oil: 1860;  enemy origin place names: 1916;  Eora: 1798;  every man and his dog: 1902;  exclusionists: 1826;  fair cop: 1897;  fair crack of the whip: 1902;  fair dinkum: 1880;  fair go: 1863;  fairy bread: 1915;  fairy floss: 1906;  fart-arse around: 1975;  fat lamp: 1827;  fed up to the back teeth: 1919;  fell off perch: 1857;  Female Factory: 1826;  fence: 1788;  ferals: 1992;  fibro-cement: 1905;  finger talk: 1934;  first fleet: 1817;  fizzer: 1861;  Flash Jack: 1826;  flash your dover: 1872;  flat chat: 1986;  flat out like a lizard drinking: 1930;  fleahouse: 1935;  fleas: 1803;  flick, give him the: 1979;  flicks: 1918;  flies: c. 1842;  floater (pie): 1923;  Flying Doctor: 1922;  flying fox: 1793;  fly veil: 1849;  football: 1829;  foot in mouth disease: 1910;  footpath: 1803;  footrot: 1822;  footy: 1894;  forester: 1861;  fossick: 1852;  four by two: 1898;  freebie: 1991;  Fremantle doctor: 1873;  Freo: 1947;  fruit fly: 1862;  full as a goog: 1942;  full board: 1875;  funnelweb: 1927;  Furphy: 1915;  gaff: 1901;  galah: 1861;  gallows: c. 1838;  gammon: 1826;  gander: 1939;  garbage: 1823;  garbo: 1950;  gas lamps: 1855;  g’day: 1848;  gee-gee: 1898;  geek: 1953;  gerries: 1991;  get a guernsey: 1902;  gibber: 1793;  gilgai: 1868;  gin: 1831;  ginormous: 1942;  Gippsland earth-worm: 1889;  give it a burl: 1911;  give me the drum: 1925;  glory box: 1904;  goanna: 1832;  goat (act the): 1881;  go bush: 1871;  goldfield: 1849;  gold mine: 1788;  gone bung: 1868;  good fist of it: 1856;  good oil: 1914;  good on ya: 1973;  goog: 1914;  goolies: 1922;  goonack: 1873;  goon: 1972;  go-slow: 1916;  go you halves: 1870;  gramma: 1874;  grass-tree: 1831;  grazier: 1804;  green bough: 1896;  greenhide: 1836;  greenies: 1982;  gremlins: 1942;  grog: 1788;  groupers: 1946;  gully-raking: c. 1837;  gum-sucker: 1849;  gum tree: 1788;  gunya: 1798;  gutless wonder: 1936;  gutser: 1917;  had it: 1945;  hairy eyeball: 1982;  half a mo: 1898;  half drunk half the time: 1967;  hambone: 1964;  handkerchiefs: 1901;  hang around like a bad smell: 1941;  hanging up: 1853;  happy as Larry: 1857;  hard: 1896;  hard case: 1900;  hard up: 1827;  hardwood: 1823;  harness cask: 1827;  hashmagandy: 1883;  hatful of arseholes: 1957;  hatter: 1858;  have a bash: 1943;  have a lash: 1892;  have the wood on: 1889;  have your guts for garters: 1888;  hawker: 1818;  hidey: 1863;  history, Australian: 1888;  hobble: c. 1830;  homestead: 1817;  hoon: 1983;  hooroo: 1916;  horizontal scrub: 1860;  hospital paddock: 1888;  hot-cross bun maker: 1903;  Hoyts, man outside: 1935;  humpy: 1838;  hundreds and thousands: 1899;  Hungry Tyson: 1877;  hunk: 1883;  huntsman spider: 1914;  Hyde Park: 1810;  Hyde Park Barracks: 1829;  icebergs: 1905;  ice block: 1934;  idiot box: 1959;  illywhacker: 1985;  indications: 1885;  inexpressibles: 1824;  inland: 1806;  in good nick: 1878;  invasion: c. 1798;  ironbark: 1803;  iron gang: 1826;  iron lace: 1919;  iron lace: 1944;  itchy grub: 1925;  jackeroo: 1845;  jack jumper: 1882;  Jack the Painter: 1846;  Jacky Howe: 1900;  jake: 1918;  jigger: 1898;  jilgie: 1873;  jimmy brits: 1942;  Jimmy Grants: 1850;  Jimmy Woodser: 1876;  jinker: 1861;  jirrand: 1827;  joey: 1841;  John Chinaman: 1839;  Johnny cake: 1827;  Johns: 1915;  journo: 1969;  jumbuck: 1841;  jumper: c. 1853;  jump-up: 1828;  Jungle juice: 1941;  kangaroo: 1770;  kangaroo dog: 1806;  kangaroo feathers: 1900;  kangaroos in the top paddock: 1987;  kangaroo paw: 1892;  kangaroo skins: 1898;  kangaroo tail soup: 1837;  keep nit: 1890;  keg: 1803;  kelpie: 1879;  kerfuffle: 1935;  kerosene: 1854;  kibosh: 1835;  kick the bucket: 1832;  kindergarten: 1890;  kindy: 1933;  king hit: 1938;  kip (swy): 1910;  Kiwi: 1918;  knock off: 1825;  knockabout: 1856;  knock your socks off: 1978;  koala: 1804;  Kokoda track: 1908;  Kokoda trail: 1942;  kookaburra: 1829;  koori: 1972;  koradji: 1834;  kylie: 1842;  laced lizard: 1789;  Lady Blamey: 1942;  lag, old: 1831;  lagerphone: 1946;  lagging: c. 1830;  lagoon: 1803;  lamb down: 1838;  lamb’s fry;  Lamington: 1901;  land mullet: 1916;  larrikin: 1870;  lawn tennis: 1874;  leaks like a sieve: 1840;  leeches: 1817;  leg in: 1871;  legless: 1986;  leg pulling: 1890;  like a hairy goat: 1913;  like the clappers: 1920;  lime burners: 1804;  lime-juicer: c. 1855;  lime-juicer: c. 1855;  line ball: 1849;  lingo: 1825;  lippy: 1927;  little bottler: 1855;  little ripper: 1912;  lollies: 1846;  long neck: 1827;  long service leave: 1898;  lower than a snake’s belly: 1914;  lubra: 1838;  lumper: 1843;  lurk: 1904;  lurk merchant: 1945;  lumber: 1805;  lyrebird: 1800;  mad as a cut snake: 1946;  makarrata: 1937;  make a crust: 1860;  making wages: 1851;  mallee: 1882;  mallee bull: 1862;  march fly: 1843;  marmalade: 1808;  marsupial: 1829;  matches: 1841;  mate: 1860;  mateship: 1857;  meatworks: 1872;  meet the eye: 1827;  Melbourne: c. 1895;  metho: 1922;  mia-mia: 1847;  miles to Griffiths tea: 1913;  milko: 1904;  Minties: 1924;  missed the bus: 1893;  mixed-bathers: 1911;  mob (of animals): 1834;  moleskin: 1823;  mongrel: 1889;  moniker: 1888;  monotreme: 1876;  moonlighter: 1878;  moonlight flit: 1834;  more hide than Jessie: 1925;  mosquitoes: 1828;  motza: 1923;  mouse spider: 1947;  mozzies: 1922;  mucker: 1899;  muck up: 1896;  muck up: 1904;  mud map: 1896;  mug: 1888;  mug lair: 1924;  mulesing: 1939;  mulga: 1858;  mullenise: 1884;  mulligrubs: 1832;  mullock: 1889;  mushies: 1904;  mushies: 1915;  muso: 1956;  mutton dressed up as lamb: 1893;  myall: 1829;  my stomach thinks my throat’s been cut: 1933;  myxomatosis: 1938;  nark: 1885;  native raw materials: 1798;  nature strip: 1928;  neck, to get it in the: 1893;  Never Never: 1861;  new Australians: 1940;  new chum: 1827;  New year’s day: 1789;  nick: 1889;  nines, dressed up to the: 1835;  Norfolk Island pine: 1829;  not backwards in coming forward: 1991;  nothing between the ears: 1938;  not much chop: 1857;  not the full quid: 1947;  not worth a crumpet: 1947;  no worries: 1970;  nulla nulla: 1808;  numbat: 1854;  Ocker: 1971;  off her kadoova: 1883;  old hand: 1827;  offsider: 1871;  off the beaten track: 1855;  old hand: 1902;  omnibus: 1851;  one armed bandits: 1939;  one oar in the water: 1994;  on his hammer: 1932;  on his hunkers: 1851;  on spec: 1845;  on the nose: 1942;  on the ran-tan: 1854;  on the wallaby: 1858;  onion, to be off: 1879;  open go: 1882;  open slather: 1916;  ophthalmia: 1819;  other-sider: 1865;  outback: 1868;  out station: 1824;  overlanders: 1840;  packer: 1873;  Paddle Pop: 1954;  paddock: 1807;  pademelon: 1842;  patta: 1803;  Pavlova: 1934;  Peach Melba: 1912;  penny farthing;  peppered: 1851;  perish, doing a: 1881;  perve: 1968;  petrolhead: 1986;  piano 1788;  picnic: c. 1854;  piece of piss: 1987;  pig’s arse!: 1977;  pig-root: 1896;  piker: 1909;  Pinchgut: c. 1842;  pissed: 1984;  pissed off: 1981;  Pitt Street farmer: 1918;  Pivot City: 1855;  plant: 1835;  platypus: 1821;  plonk: 1916;  plute: 1900;  poler: 1848;  Pompey dodger: 1855;  pong: 1928;  portable soup: 1821;  pobblebonk: 1990;  poddy: 1864;  pointing the bone: 1901;  poison bait: 1847;  poisoner: 1900;  poke in the eye with a burnt stick: 1887;  poke mullock: 1912;  poker machine: 1895;  pokies: 1967;  Pommy 1912;  pooch: 1927;  possie: 1917;  possum: c. 1839;  possum skin cloak: c. 1840;  post: 1827;  preselection: 1857;  prezzies: 1998;  prickly pear: 1827;  Prince Alberts: 1894;  printing press: 1795;  privy: 1813;  Progress Association: 1860;  prospecting: 1849;  prospector: 1849;  puddling: 1851;  punt: 1834;  purler: 1848;  Push, the: 1899;  put the acid on: 1898;  put the boot in: 1906;  put the frighteners on: 1973;  quarantine: c. 1842;  Queen Street cocky: 1926;  quid: 1866;  rabbit-oh: 1894;  rabbit-proof fence: 1886;  rabbits: 1860;  rack off: 1976;  Rafferty’s rules: 1906;  ratbag: 1925;  rat with a gold tooth: 1953;  rawhide: 1849;  real corker: 1886;  redback: 1883;  redgum: 1816;  red ned: 1949;  reffo: 1945;  rego: 1972;  rellies: 1978;  remittance: 1864;  ribuck: 1891;  ridgy didge: 1974;  riding attire: 1900;  right as rain: 1874;  righto: 1902;  ring-barking: c. 1844;  ringer: 1870;  road: 1788;  road train: 1913;  ‘rock carvings’: 1788;  roof rabbit: 1891;  ropeable: 1847;  rort: 1901;  rosiner: 1930;  rotgut: 1831;  rough around the edges: 1952;  rough as bags: 1911;  rough as guts: 1920;  rough end of the pineapple: 1950;  rough spin: 1868;  rouseabout: 1907;  rum: 1826;  run: 1834;  runners: 1961;  runs like a dream: 1919;  rustbucket: 1949;  ruthless and toothless: 1945;  sacred sites: 1927;  Saint Andrews spider: 1939;  saltbush: 1848;  salted: 1854;  sand: 1846;  sandgroper: 1881;  sandy blight: c. 1865;  sandshoes: 1884;  sandy blight: 1900;  sanger: 1987;  saucy: 1860;  sausage roll: 1842;  sawney: 1826;  scab: 1842;  scads: 1925;  scallops: 1994;  scalp: 1852;  scalper: 1898;  schools: 1796;  scrammy: 1857;  screen door: 1903;  scribbly gum: 1886;  scrub up well: 1977;  scrub-bash: 1929;  scungy: 1927;  sea-breeze: 1830;  search party: 1833;  selector: 1862;  selfie: 2013;  semaphore: 1836;  semi-detached: 1850;  Send it down, Hughie: 1910;  sent out: 1882;  Seppo: 1998;  serve, give him a: 1986;  servo: 1985;  settler: 1803;  shag on a rock, a: 1843;  shandygaff: 1848;  shanty: 1830;  shanty: 1832;  shearing: c. 1840;  sheep dog: 1821;  sheila: 1921;  she’ll be right: 1848;  sheoak: 1803;  sheoak: 1803;  shicer: 1853;  shicker: 1883;  shindy: 1828;  shingle, lost or loose: 1846;  shirty: 1865;  shivoo: 1881;  shit for brains: 1984;  shivoo: 1882;  shonky: 1958;  shoot through: 1944;  shoot (wave): 1910;  short and curlies: 1982;  short arms, deep pockets: 1951;  shout: c. 1852;  show pony: 1940;  shypoo: 1881;  sick as a dog: 1830;  sickie: 1952;  silent cop: 1921;  silly coot: 1900;  silver-tails: 1879;  Simon Pure: 1832;  sin bin: 1968;  since sliced bread: 1952;  skedaddle: 1874;  skid lid: 1953;  skite: 1887;  sky-pilot: 1900;  slab of beer: 1911;  slanguage: 1896;  sledging: 1979;  sleepout: 1914;  sling off: 1891;  sling off: 1892;  sling your hook: 1884;  slip rails: c. 1845;  slop clothing: 1805;  slope: 1852;  slow as a wet week: 1923;  sly grog: 1825;  smallgoods: 1865;  smalls: 1945;  smoke: 1891;  smoke-oh: 1893;  smoodger: 1907;  snaggers: 1945;  snow-dropper: 1827;  Snowy Mountains: 1825;  Snowy River: 1834;  snuffle buster: 1875;  soldier settler: 1917;  songman: 1949;  sool: 1901;  sort: 1945;  southerly buster: 1854;  sparrow’s fart: 1942;  SP bookie: 1920;  Speewah: 1892;  spider: 1858;  spieler: 1881;  spifflicated: 1848;  spine bashing: 1941;  spitting chips: 1899;  spit the dummy: 1979;  split: c. 1833;  spruik: 1905;  squatter: 1825;  squiz: 1905;  standover: 1936;  station: c. 1860;  St George’s Terrace cocky: 1914;  sticky beak: 1917;  stiffener: 1906;  stir the possum: 1894;  stock horse: 1837;  stock station: 1823;  stockwhip: c. 1858;  stockyard: c. 1838;  stone the crows: 1913;  stonkered: 1918;  stony: 1899;  stony broke: 1883;  storekeeper: 1899;  stork (as a bringer of babies): 1920;  stoush: 1887;  strapped for cash: 1924;  stretcher: 1828;  strides: 1913;  stringybark: 1803;  Struth: 1895;  stubby: 1965;  stunned mullet: 1902;  such is life: 1880;  sucked in: 1863;  sulky: 1810;  sulky: 1900;  sundowner: 1906;  sunnies: 1961;  suss: 1994;  swag: 1851;  swag, humping the: 1851;  swag, humping the: 1852;  swagman: 1861;  swy: 1945;  Sydney Harbour: 1822;  Sydney or the bush: 1849;  Sydney side;  Sydneysider: 1852;  TAFE: 1974;  taipan (snake): 1932;  Tallowfat: 1862;  tall poppy: 1864;  tanks: 1791;  tanks: 1803;  tar pot: 1870;  tart: 1898;  Tassie: 1878;  Taswegian: 1940;  tea: 1834;  telephone: 1880;  Territorian: 1868;  The Ashes: 1882;  the pip: 1872;  the raw prawn: 1942;  The Rocks: 1803;  thick as two short planks: 1975;  thief: c. 1855;  thingummybob: 1945;  thongs: 1959;  thumb buster: 1873;  tickets of leave: 1806;  tickets on self: 1901;  tinny (beer): 1976;  tinny (boat): 1986;  tip the bucket: 1947;  tomahawker: 1873;  tommy: 1850;  too-hard basket: 1950;  too right: 1917;  Top End: 1923;  track: 1817;  tracky daks: 2000;  traps: c. 1831;  Traymobile:1919;  trey (threepence): 1900;  triantelope: c. 1845;  troppo: 1942;  truckie: 1945;  true blue: 1826;  tucker: 1852;  tucker bag: 1871;  tucker box: 1867;  turn dingo: 1940;  turps, on the: 1929;  turps, on the: 1962;  two-bob watch: 1922;  two men and a dog: 1887;  two shakes: 1839;  two up: 1855;  typhoid fever: 1883;  underground mutton: 1903;  under wet cement: 1978;  union: 1896;  union camp: 1887;  up a gumtree: 1845;  up the country: 1788;  up the duff: 1975;  up the pole: 1915;  up the spout: 1832;  urger: 1921;  Vandemonian: 1842;  veg out: 1986;  verandah: 1802;  vote with the feet: 1940;  waddy: 1801;  wag: 1885;  Walers: 1859;  walkabout: 1859;  wallaby: 1798;  wallaby stew: 1859;  wallaroo: 1828;  wanker: 1974;  waratah: 1797;  warrigal: 1841;  washing (for gold): 1849;  wash house: 1901;  water: 1788;  water bag: 1858;  wattle: 1789;  Wattle Day: 1895;  weather-board: 1838;  weirdo: 1968;  wet behind the ears: 1935;  whacko: 1934;  whaler: 1900;  wharfie: 1911;  wharf lumper: 1875;  What do you think this is? Bush week?: 1945;  what the cat dragged in: 1923;  wheelie bin: 1986;  whinger: 1907;  whiskers: 1829;  white-ant: 1919;  white ants: 1804;  wide awake hat: 1846;  widgie: 1950;  widow maker: 1990;  wigwam for a goose’s bridle: 1916;  wilga: 1879;  willy-willy: 1875;  wire: 1899;  within a bull’s roar: 1934;  within cooee: 1858;  wombat: 1799;  women in trousers: 1835;  Woolloomooloo: 1829;  woomera: 1793;  Woop Woop: 1910;  wouldn’t be dead for quids: 1921;  wowser: 1903;  wrinklies: 1969;  wurlie: 1839;  yabby: 1861;  yacker: 1875;  yarraman: 1846;  yobbo: 1975;  yonks: 1981;  your blood is worth bottling: 1903;  zack (sixpence): 1912;  Zambuck: 1926;  zonked: 1943; 


 

Monday 8 January 2024

A closer to definitive list of Oz colloquialisms

This carries on from an earlier post

Just a note to file, added February 8, because I have not posted anything here: I am now up over 170,00 words, and maybe 800 words and phrases in 2000+ entries. I will say more when I finish.

I'm getting there. If you want to see if your favourite rates, here's the list, prepared just after I added clothes props (pre-1840) and milko (WA, early 1900s).

Suggestions are welcome, and I note that pooch, probably came from the US (but who knew?), and I think the original Brown's cows were probably Irish... 

[Edit 13 January: there are now more than 600 expressions and 1500 samples of text, and I have edited the list to show earliest-known-date-right-now. New list is below.]

aborigine  (1798);  according to Cocker  (1826);  aerial ping pong  (1945);  aggro  (1970);  aggy  (1899);  alligator  (1788);  ambo  (1928);  ankle-biter  (1900);  another pair of sleeves  (1892);  ant bed  (1893);  ants  (1770);  Anzac  (1915);  Anzac biscuits  (1916);  ANZAC Day  (1915);  apples (she’s)  (1941);  Arthur or Martha  (1943);  Arvo  (1926);  Aussie  (1915);  Aussie Rules  (1907);  Aussie salute  (1921);  Australasia  (1793);  Australia  (1793);  Australian Rules  (1885);  babbler  (1910);  back-blocks  (1862);  back of beyond  (1830);  back of Bourke  (1871);  bagman  (1905);  Bagman’s Gazette  (1900);  bail up  (1844.);  Bananaland  (1881);  bandicoot  (1799);  banker, running a  (1866);  barbie  (1973);  bark hut  (1815);  barney  (1855);  barracker  (1881);  barrack  (1883);  bastard  (1945);  bathers  (1911);  bathing  (1836);  bathing dress  (1830);  Bathurst burr  (1850);  beak  (1838);  beano  (1908);  bean (without a)  (1900);  beauty bottler  (1957);  bee’s knees  (1874);  Belyando spew  (c. 1864);  berley  (1871);  bicycle  (1851);  big note  (1938);  big smoke  (1854);  big wigs  (1825);  bike  (1898);  bikkies  (1890);  bikkies (big)  (1977);  bilby  (1886);  billabong  (1838);  billy  (1848);  billycart  (1898);  bindi-eye  (1907);  bingey  (1882);  bint  (1945);  bitser  (1926);  blackbirding  (1872);  blackfellows  (1840);  blackleg  (1865);  Black Maria  (1868);  black stump  (1865);  black tracker  (1882);  Blind Freddy  (1907);  bloke  (1848);  bloody  (1853);  blow  (1929);  blowfly  (1829);  blowie  (1911);  Blucher boots  (1821);  bludger  (1897);  bluegum  (1803);  blue (in the sense of lose money)  (1898);  Blue Mountain parrot  (1823);  Blue Mountains  (1793);  blue, start a  (1938);  bluetongue  (1849);  Bluey  (1845);  bluey  (1880);  bob (shilling)  (1838);  bodgie  (1950);  Bogan  (1987);  bogey  (1865);  bog roll  (1988);  Bondi tram, like a  (1943);  bonzer  (1851);  boodle  (1898);  Boofhead  (1924);  boomerang  (1824);  borak  (1893);  boshter  (1903);  bosker  (1912);  boss cockie  (1875);  Boss-of-the-Board  (1900);  Botany Bay  (1786);  boundary rider  (1860);  bowyangs  (1889);  brass razoo  (1927);  breakaway  (1893);  brekky  (1900);  brickfielder  (1830);  Brown’s cows  (1841);  brum (penny)  (1861);  brumby  (1871);  Buckley’s chance  (1887);  budgerigar  (1845);  buggy  (1806);  bullock driver  (1813);  bunya bunya  (1841);  bunyip  (1845);  bunyip aristocracy  (1853);  burning o  (1805);  burrawang  (1831);  bush  (1801);  bush carpenter  (1902);  bushed  (1847);  bushfire  (1831);  bush inn  (c. 1850);  bushman  (1832);  bushranger  (1805);  bush store  (1847);  bush telegraph  (1863);  bushwoman  (1869);  Cabbage Garden  (1842);  cabbage tree hat  (1799);  cabbage tree mob  (1841);  canary  (1853);  cark  (1983);  cart  (c. 1854);  caser  (1892);  Catherine Hayes  (1859);  cedar  (1803);  celestials  (1856);  chap  (1898);  chats  (1917);  chocolate crackles  (1937);  chook  (1889);  Chow  (1855);  Christmas beetle  (1893);  chuck  (1838);  churchyarder  (1900);  chyack  (1873);  Cigar  (1859);  Circular Quay  (1836);  clean skins  (1868);  clear out  (1831);  clobber  (1884);  clothes props  (1846);  coach travel  (1821);  cobber  (1890);  cobbler  (1872);  cobbler’s pegs  (1864);  cockatoo  (c. 1854);  cockatoo fence  (1842);  cock-eye bob  (1884);  cockies  (1878);  coffee  (1902);  coffee tent  (1852);  concertina  (1892);  cooee  (1826);  Coogee  (1831);  coolamon  (1854);  coot  (1915);  Cornstalk  (1827);  cossies  (1903);  cove  (1853);  cow cocky  (1907);  crack hardy  (1897);  creek  (1790);  cricket  (1804);  crinoline  (1839);  cronk  (1900);  crook  (1896);  cropper, come a  (1859);  cry crack  (1871);  cultural cringe  (1951);  currency  (1822);  cut out  (1867);  damper  (1825);  dead flat  (1900);  dead marine  (1856);  deaf adder  (1832);  deaner (shilling)  (1892);  death adder  (1845);  didgeridoo  (1918);  didn’t come down in the last shower  (1893);  digger  (1817);  digging  (1849);  diggings  (1848);  dilly bag 1829);  dingbat  (1887);  dingo  (1788);  dinkum  (1917);  dinky di  (1914);  disperse  (1805);  Dixie  (1918);  do a Melba  (1950);  dob in  (1953);  dog’s breakfast  (1903);  doing the Block  (1854);  dollop  (1833);  Dolly’s wax  (1909);  donah  (1889);  done like a dinner  (1838);  done me dash  (1915);  donkey-supper hat  (c. 1897);  doover  (1942);  dowak  (1848);  down the gurgler  (1979);  down under  (1907);  drafting  (1836);  dray  (1820);  drongo  (1837);  drop bear 1967);  drover’s dog  (1868);  dud  (1918);  duds  (1900);  duffer  (1853);  duffing  (1856);  dummy  (1896);  dunny  (1942);  earbash 1944);  ecology  (1905);  elastic-side boots  (1896);  elderly  (1900);  emu  (1788);  emu eggs  (1886);  exclusionists  (1826);  fair dinkum  (1880);  fair go  (1863);  fairy bread  (1915);  fat lamp  (1827);  fell off perch  (1857);  fence  (1788);  first fleet  (1817);  flat chat  (1986);  flat out like a lizard drinking  (1930);  fleas  (1878);  flies  (1849);  floater (pie)  (1923);  flying fox  (1793);  fly veil  (1849);  football  (1829);  footpath  (1803);  forester  (1861);  fossick  (1852);  freebie  (1991);  Fremantle doctor  (1873);  full as a goog:);  funnelweb  (1927);  Furphy  (1915);  gaff  (1901);  galah  (1861);  gander  (1939);  gas lamps  (1855);  g’day  (1848);  gee-gee  (1898);  gibber  (1853);  gilgai  (1868);  gin  (1831);  Gippsland earth-worm  (1889);  give it a burl  (1911);  glory box  (1904);  goanna  (1832);  goat (act the)  (1881);  gold mine  (1788);  gone bung  (1868);  good oil  (1914);  good-on-ya  (1982);  gooley  (1922);  goonack  (1873);  grass-tree  (1831);  green bough  (1896);  greenhide  (1836);  gremlins  (1942);  gully-raking  (c. 1837);  gum-sucker  (1849);  gunya  (1798);  gutser  (1917);  had it  (1945);  half a mo  (1898);  hanging up  (1853);  happy as Larry  (1857);  hard  (1896);  hard case  (1900);  hard up  (1827);  hatter  (1858);  have a bash  (1943);  having a lend of  (1907);  hawker  (1818);  hobble  (c. 1830);  homestead  (1817);  hoon  (1983);  Hooroo);  hot-cross bun maker  (1903);  humpy  (1838);  hundreds and thousands  (1899);  hunk  (1883);  Hyde Park Barracks  (1829);  ice block  (1934);  idiot box  (1959);  inexpressibles  (1824);  invasion  (c. 1798);  ironbark  (1803);  iron gang  (1826);  jackeroo  (1845);  Jacky Howe  (1900);  jake  (1918);  jake  (1925);  jilgie  (1873);  Jimmies  (1850);  jirrand  (1827);  joey  (1841);  John Chinaman  (1839);  Johnny cake  (1827);  Johns  (1915);  jumbuck  (1841);  jumper  (c. 1853);  kangaroo  (1770);  kangaroo dog  (1806);  kangaroo feathers  (1900);  kangaroo feathers  (1901);  kangaroos in the top paddock  (1987);  kangaroo tail soup  (1837);  kibosh  (1835);  kick the bucket  (1832);  koala  (1804);  Kokoda track  (1908);  Kokoda trail  (1942);  kookaburra  (1829);  kooliman  (see coolamon);  kylie  (1842);  lag, old  (1831);  lagging  (c. 1830);  lamb down  (1838);  Lamington  (1901);  larrikin  (1870);  lawn tennis  (1874);  leg in  (1871);  leg pulling  (1890);  lime burners  (1804);  lingo  (1825);  little ripper  (1912);  lollies  (1846);  lubra  (1838);  lumper  (1843);  lurk  (1904);  lyrebird  (1800);  mad as a cut snake  (1946);  make a crust  (1860);  making wages  (1851);  mallee  (1882);  mallee bull  (1862);  marmalade  (1855);  matches  (1841);  meet the eye  (1827);  mia-mia  (1847);  milko  (1904);  missed the bus  (1893);  mob (of animals)  (1834);  moleskin  (1823);  moniker  (1888);  moonlight flit  (1834);  mosquitoes  (1828);  motza  (1923);  mozzies  (1922);  mucker  (1899);  muck up  (1896);  mug lair  (1924);  mulga  (1858);  mulligrubs  (1832);  mullock  (1889);  myall  (1829);  nark  (1885);  neck, to get it in the  (1893);  Never Never  (1861);  new chum  (1827);  New year’s day  (1789);  nines, dressed up to the  (1835);  Norfolk Island pine  (1829);  no worries  (1970);  nulla nulla  (1808);  numbat  (1854);  Ocker  (1975);  off her kadoova  (1883);  old hand  (1827);  omnibus  (1851);  on his hunkers  (1851);  on the nose  (1942);  on the wallaby  (1858);  onion, to be off  (1898);  ophthalmia  (1819);  outback  (1868);  outback  (1868);  );  overlanders  (1840);  overlanders  (1841);  packer  (1873);  paddock  (1807);  patta  (1803);  Pavlova  (1934);  Peach Melba  (1912);  peppered  (1851);  perish, doing a  (1881);  piano 1788);  Pivot City  (1855);  plant  (1835);  platypus  (1824);  plonk  (1916);  poddy  (1864);  poison bait  (1847);  poisoner  (1900);  poke mullock  (1912);  poley  (1852);  Pommy 1912);  pooch  (1927);  possie  (1917);  possum  (c. 1839);  possum skin cloak  (c. 1840);  post  (1827);  prickly pear  (1827);  privy  (1813);  prospecting  (1849);  prospector  (1849);  punt  (1834);  Push, the  (1899);  put the acid on  (1898);  quid  (1866);  rabbit-proof fence  (1886);  radium  (1900);  Rafferty’s rules  (1906);  ratbag  (1925);  rat with a gold tooth  (1953);  rawhide  (1849);  real corker  (1886);  redback  (1883);  redgum  (1816);  Reffo  (1945);  remittance  (1864);  ribuck  (1891);  riding attire  (1900);  right as rain  (1874);  righto  (1902);  ring-barking  (c. 1854);  ringer  (1870);  road  (1788);  rort  (1901);  rouseabout  (1907);  rough spin  (1868);  run  (1834);  ruthless and toothless  (1945);  salted  (1854);  sandgroper  (1846);  sandy blight  (c. 1865);  sawney  (1826);  Sawney  (1827);  scab  (1842);  scalper  (1898);  sea-breeze  (1830);  selector  (1862);  Send it down, Hughie  (1910);  sent out  (1882);  servo  (1988);  settler  (1803);  shag on a rock, a  (1843);  shanty  (1830);  sheila  (1923);  sheoak  (1803);  shicer  (1853);  shicker  (1883);  shindy  (1828);  shingle, lost or loose  (1846);  shirty  (1865);  shivoo  (1881);  shoot through  (1944);  shout  (c. 1852);  shout  (1858);  sickie  (1952);  silly coot  (1900);  silver-tails  (1879);  Simon Pure  (1832);  skedaddle  (1874);  skite  (1887);  sky-pilot  (1900);  slanguage  (1896);  sling off  (1891);  sling your hook  (1884);  slip rails  (c. 1845);  slope  (1852);  sly grog  (1825);  smoke-oh  (1893);  smoodger  (1907);  snaggers  (1945);  Snowy Mountains  (1825);  Snowy River  (1834);  sool  (1901);  sort  (1945);  southerly buster  (1854);  sparrow’s fart  (1942);  Speewah  (1892);  spieler  (1881);  spifflicated  (1848);  split  (c. 1833);  spruik  (1905);  squatter  (1825);  squiz  (1905);  station  (c. 1860);  sticky beak  (1917);  stir the possum  (1894);  stock horse  (1837);  stock station  (1823);  stockwhip  (c. 1858);  stone the crows);  stony  (1899);  stony broke  (1883);  storekeeper  (1899);  stork (as a bringer of babies)  (1884);  stoush  (1887);  strict Q.T.  (1877);  strides  (1913);  stringybark  (1803);  Struth  (1895);  stunned mullet  (1902);  sulky  (1810);  sundowner  (1906);  swag  (1851);  swag, humping the  (1851);  swagman  (1861);  swy  (1945);  Sydney Harbour  (1822);  Sydney or the bush  (1849);  Sydneysider  (1852);  taipan (snake)  (1932);  tall poppy  (1864);  tart  (1898);  tea  (1834);  telephone  (1886);  The Ashes  (1882);  the pip  (1872);  the raw prawn  (1942);  thingummybob  (1945);  thumb buster  (1873);  tickets on self  (1901);  tommy  (1850);  track  (1817);  traps  (c. 1831);  tray (threepence)  (1912);  triantelope  (c. 1845);  troppo  (1942);  true blue  (1826);  tucker  (1852);  tucker bag  (1871);  tucker box  (1867);  turps, on the  (1929);  two-bob watch  (1922);  two up  (1855);  typhoid fever  (1883);  union  (1896);  up the country  (1788);  up the duff  (1975);  up the pole  (1915);  urger  (1921);  Vandemonian  (1842);  verandah  (1802);  waddy  (1801);  Waler  (1859);  walkabout  (1859);  wallaby  (1827);  wallaby stew  (1859);  wallaroo  (1845);  waratah  (1797);  washing (for gold)  (1849);  wash house  (1901);  water  (1788);  water bag  (1858);  wattle  (1789);  welsher  (1861);  whaler  (1900);  wharfie  (1911);  What do you think this is? Bush week?  (1945);  whiskers  (1829);  white ants  (1804);  wide awake hat  (1846);  widgie  (1950);  wigwam for a goose’s bridle  (1916);  wilga  (1879);  willy-willy  (1875);  wire  (1899);  within a bull’s roar  (1934);  within cooee  (1858);  wombat  (1799);  Woolloomooloo  (1829);  woomera  (1841);  Woop Woop  (1910);  wowser  (1903);  wurlie  (1839);  yabby  (1861);  yacker  (1875);  yarraman  (1846);  yobbo  (1975);  your blood is worth bottling  (1903);  zack (sixpence)  (1912);  zeppelin  (1900);  zonked  (1943).

Now, if you happen to know what Miles Franklin's "donkey-supper hat" means, or what the bleep  a thumb buster is, please let me know. I suspect it's the old English cartwheel penny of Kings George III and IV: it is definitely a small-denomination coin...or you know some that I have missed, please shout out.

I'm still working on it...